TCT 637 Terrorism and Society

Terrorism does not emerge from, nor does it exist in, a vacuum. This course examines the various societal conflicts and dynamics that contribute to the rise, and continuing growth, of terrorism, as well as some of the psychological factors that may contribute to the development of individual terrorists. This course will further examine the effects that terrorism has on societies and how societies have learned to adapt to, and cope with, this ever-spreading form of political, religious, and social violence.

The course learning outcomes that you will demonstrate upon completion of this course are as follows:

Examine some of the main social causes that are central to most conflicts (class, political, ideological/religious, and ethnic). 

Gain a conceptual and experiential grounding in the complex environment, multiple challenges, and potential interdependent nature of threats facing political leaders. 

Improve your ability to identify, critically analyze, and forcefully articulate threats to North America, and make policy recommendations to domestic leadership. 

Enhance your ability to listen and communicate accurately and precisely and to work effectively with others on the nature of threats facing the U.S.

Further prepare you as effective leaders and managers in homeland defense and homeland security organizations. 

Don’t hesitate to reach out!

Henley-Putnam’s commitment to service begins with your first call with an advisor and continues through graduation. Our classes are small, so you are never just a number. We get to know you, your goals and your needs. You will be supported by a team of professionals who will help you track your degree progression, advise you on course selection, and inform you of relevant services such as tutoring and mentoring. Your faculty members will be available to you, as will the deans and administrators.

To request an application or get information about any of our programs, fill out the form below. An advisor will be in touch to answer your questions. Or contact us directly at 855-246-7440 or HenleyPutnam@national.edu